Portrait done in oil on canvas.

Conversation between Birdwoman and Fishman

In this painting critically endangered animals have been hidden inside boxes, as I believe that when we are made aware of the fact that so many of our animals are endangered we feel bad, and then immediately put all thought of it away, hence the closed boxes. Each one is to be opened, looked at and then closed again.

Some of the animals have been put inside little frames; these animals were on the endangered list at some time, they have been saved from extinction with intensive breeding programmes.

Inside one of the little frames is the face of a Koi-San, their way of life is also endangered, I have included them because their lives are inextricably linked to nature and when their way of life disappears a very valuable part of our heritage will be lost. In my opinion the way they live is being used to attract tourists instead of seriously helping to see if their culture can be restored and/or saved.

The two figures on either side represent the human race; we are always hungry for more power, more money, more electricity, more fuel, more food, more water. It seems we are never satisfied and are unable to say: “it is enough”.

The outline of an elephant in the center represents our continent.

 

Portrait done in oil on canvas.

This sculpture represents the artist as a slaughtered animal hanging from a hook with it’s guts spilling out, defenseless and stripped of protection.

It is not supposed to be disgusting, but a bit gaudy, a bit overdone, because that is what the artist gives, more than expected or sometimes, understood.

An artist delves in his/her own soul to find the images he/she wants to portray, this sometimes takes courage, although the process of creating it is usually relatively painless, the reception of it is not.

The Artist

Resized viewWe have become two dimensional beings since the onslaught of social media.  We are used to short bytes of information.  Our lives are inextricably linked to technology.  In the future technology will be physically linked to our brain by a socket implanted in our heads and any gadgets can be plugged in or linked as can be seen on the side view of the sculpture.

Where is your cell phone&/tablet right now?

 

We are serene only when we are close to nature.

Wonderstone with wood.

Details of the inside of a sea shell done as an abstract painting in oil on canvas.

Or the Universal Politician
A day at the sea

My new environment is starting to influence my paintings.

Soft pastel on pastel paper.

 

When feathers appear, Angels are near I

 

This was the first painting in my new esoteric phase.

When feathers appear Angels are near.

 

When feathers appear, Angels are near II

 

This was the second painting in my new esoteric phase.

When feathers appear Angels are near.

 

 

This is the third in the feathers series, oil on a a very large canvas.

 

 

When feathers appear Angels are near III
Shell oil on canvas

 

I am living by the seaside and it is definitely influencing what I am painting.

Oil on canvas 60 x 80 cm.

 

This project kept me busy for nearly four months.
It is a pencil drawing of my father, the photo was taken on his 90th birthday. The drawing is 115 x 80 cm, unframed, the framed size is obviously larger. After I finished this I knew that I was not done yet and found the photo I took of him at the funeral parlour, where I went to say my good bye’s. However they rolled him out and displayed him in a hushed atmosphere, he looked totally unfamiliar; small and quiet, the exact opposite of what he was in life. I then used this photo to do a portrait in colour with soft pastel pencils.
The process was incredible because I felt at times that I was working in the fourth dimension, and time and space had no longer any limits. Felt a bit weird the whole time.
But art is a journey, never just the end result, and this illustrated it to me perfectly.The one was framed behind the other as I wanted the dead portrait to be a surprise behind the alive portrait. Because death follows life, inevitably.

Double frame. Pencil sketch and soft pastel
The second portrait "Death"
This is the size of the framed work.
This is how it looks when the window is opened.
Zebras at watering hole

I saw this photo on the Internet and asked the photographer for permission to paint it because it just begged to be painted. Dr Leo van Vuuren was so kind as to give me permission. And this was the result. I am very happy with this.

This was another one of the wildlife photos taken by wild life photographer that just wanted to be painted. This time the photographer was Peter Delaney. The painting just worked, every brush stroke was just perfect. Enjoyed it very much.

Vulture taking a dustbath.
Two bossum buddies playing on the beach.

This is done in artist’s crayons and soft pastel as a commission.

A large charcoal sketch of an elephant shaking off mud and dust. Photo taken by wild life photographer peter Delaney.
The movement in the photo drew my attention.

Vulture taking a dustbath.
Two bossum buddies playing on the beach.

An artist’s crayons sketch of a playful cubs.

Two bossum buddies playing on the beach.

Another artist’s crayons sketch of a young lion.

Share This